Triplets

I am going to make an attempt at quoting, or rather paraphrasing maybe, it was never my strong side. Anyway, Picasso once apparently said something like this sometime: When drawing a body, a face or any other part of the human (or animal), don’t get frustrated trying to draw both sides the same. Because they are not, the human body is not symmetrical.

Thus, I made an experiment, which by no means is new or original, but this is my experiment, with my body, and with my results.

Symmetrical
Symmetrical
Symmetrical

Our rights, our wrongs

Inspired by the Japanese photographer Chino Otsuka, I took some of my old analog photos, that don’t really stand out on their own, and treated them with hot oil. Below is the result. I like how unpredictable the colors and bubbles on the surface turned out, yet how precisely I could steer the oil.

Fried
Fried
Fried
Fried
Fried
Fried
Fried
Fried
Fried

 

And despite all of the terrible things going on around us in the world these days, I am extraordinarily happy today, as our already big family became a little bigger today. 

Paint book

Remember a couple of months ago when I wrote about paint books? I showed some small pieces of what my book looked like back then, and boy, did it develop from that! Here you go, the finished piece, which is exhibited in our living room at the moment, for guests to pick up and look through, and even myself. Each page is filled with small compositions that can be looked at in so many different ways. The books helps me relax, and encourages me to fly away with imagination.

Paintbook
Paintbook
Paintbook
Paintbook
Paintbook
Paintbook
Paintbook

Doors pt.1

One of our big assignments at school this spring was to research the relationships and ratios between doors and windows. This was to be presented in large format photos, to preserve and document as much detail as possible. In their full size, these photos below are huge, as they are all built up and stitched together from 8-15 photos. This is to avoid distortion in the photos, and to be able to use them as references in architectural studies. The aim of this study was to understand what makes a good door, and compare how designers/architects/carpenters looked at doors through different style eras. And as I happened to spend almost a week in Finland during the semester, a natural approach for me was to compare the architecture in Finland and Malta. Below are some of my doors from Helsinki.

Helsinki

Helsinki

Helsinki



My copper prints

Etching

This semester I took a course in copper etching and printing. Next week is our last printing session, and I’d like to show you all what I’m working on. So let me start with explaining what this is all about. Printing can be done with many different techniques, such as screenprinting, woodcut, intaglio, etching and many more. Last semester I worked with woodcut, and this semester I decided to dig even deeper into the world of printing by printing with copper.

Etching

When using copper, one can print with two different techniques: drypoint and etching.

Drypoint: To make a drypoint print one requires a copper plate and a scriber. You scratch the design into the copperplate using the scriber. Once the design is done, the plate is covered with oilbased ink. The ink is then wiped off with a cloth from the smooth areas of the plate, but will get stuck in the scratched parts. Then the design is transferred to paper in a press. This technique requires a minimal amount of materials, but can be quite tedious and require a lot of strength. Also the lines are not as fine and smooth as in etching.

Etching: This technique requires more materials. First step is to degrease the copperplate, this is very important as the following steps will not work if the copper has any grease or oils on it. Once the plate is clean, it is covered with a soft varnish and left to dry. When the varnish is dry, the design is drawn into the varnish using a scriber. Since the varnish is relatively soft, drawing is easy and one can make long and beautiful lines. To get the design onto the copperplate (for now it is only in the varnish), it is submerged into an acid bath. The acid will then “eat” or etch the copperplate wherever the varnish does not cover the plate –> every line that was drawn in the varnish will now appear in the copper. The acid baths are a time consuming process. My plates needed to be in 5 acid baths, and since they have to dry thoroughly between each bath and we only have one session a week, the etching process of my copper plates took 5 weeks. After the etching is deep enough on the copper plate, the varnish is removed and the plate can now be printed using the same method as with a drypoint.

Sketchbook
Sketchbook
Sketchbook
Right before this course started, I visited the Picasso museum in Malaga, where they had a temporary exhibition showcasing many of Picasso’s prints. This visit inspired me deeply, and my prints would not look remotely the same if I had never seen Picasso’s prints. The idea for my designs origin from my interest in portraying people. I love portraits, but I have recently realised that some specific parts of the female body is rarely shown in art. So inspired by Picasso, with a pen in my hand I started sketching down irregular vaginas, hanging boobs and wrinkly and folded bellies. This post contains my own sketches and prints from these past months.

What I love about etching is how every print is unique, compared to woodcuts for example, where each print is nearly the same.

Etching
Etching